Solesta Fecal Incontinence Treatment

SOLESTA is used for the treatment of bowel control problems (also referred to as accidental bowel leakage, or fecal incontinence) in patients 18 years and older who have tried and failed other "conservative" therapies such as change in diet, fiber therapy, and medications.

The most common risks of treatment with SOLESTA are mild or moderate pain or discomfort in the rectum or anus, and minor to moderate bleeding or spotting from the rectum following treatment. Some patients experience fever, stomach problems such as diarrhea or constipation, and infection after treatment.

Move ahead with more accident-free days

move ahead with more
accident-free days

What are bowel control problems?

Bowel control problems occur when someone has difficulty controlling bowel movements. This can cause stool to leak during daily activities. People often refer to them as accidents. Healthcare providers may call it "fecal incontinence" (FI) or "accidental bowel leakage" (ABL). Having these problems can affect your quality of life in many ways. You may feel embarrassed or even depressed. And you may be forced to spend a great deal of your time simply trying to cope, which can have a big impact on your activities and relationships. Bowel control problems affect 19 million adults in the United States.

If this sounds like you, you might have bowel control problems:

  • Having leaks or other accidents weekly or monthly
  • Stool staining of underwear
    — Showering or bathing more often
  • Carrying items to stay clean
  • Wearing pads, or carrying an extra change of clothes or underwear
  • Usually staying near a bathroom

feel the confidence that comes with
better bowel control

If you are having bowel control problems, talk to your doctor

Talk to a doctor who is a specialist in treating bowel control problems. These experts include colon and rectal specialists, gastroenterologists, or urogynecologists. If you've tried managing your condition by adding more fiber to your diet or taking over-the-counter medicines and those things didn't work, Solesta might.

With Solesta, it's possible to:

Feel more confident about your bowel control

Solesta is FDA approved to improve bowel control. In fact, most people treated with it had more days without accidents and fewer leaks. Solesta has been shown to actually improve quality of life in many ways. These included less frustration and embarrassment from bowel control problems.

Get more control over your bowels

On average, Solesta has been proven to reduce accidents in as early as 4 weeks.

Enjoy life more instead of dealing with bowel control problems

In clinical trials, Solesta offered long-lasting relief for up to 3 years. Patients taking Solesta felt better about their bowel control and their lives.

Plan activities with less worry

Whether you're planning a long weekend away or just enjoying time with friends and family, you can be more confident with better bowel control. For people treated with Solesta, bowel control kept improving during the first year.

It is important for you to know that Solesta (hyaluronic acid/dextranomer) does not work for everyone and you may not benefit from Solesta treatment. It is also important for you to know that you may not experience immediate improvement after your first treatment with Solesta and the full effects of Solesta may not be apparent until 3 to 6 months after treatment.

Move ahead with more accident-free days
Move ahead with more accident-free days

a 10-minute treatment can give you
LONG-LASTING RELIEF*

What is Solesta?

Solesta isn't surgery. It's a quick procedure performed during a doctor visit. It's a gel given in 4 injections. Solesta injections are usually painless. That's because they are given in an area of the anal canal where there is no pain sensation.

Solesta is made from natural materials that are just like the natural starches, sugars, and tissues found in your body. This nonsurgical approach takes about 10 minutes.

The most common risks of treatment with Solesta are mild or moderate pain or discomfort in the rectum or anus, and minor to moderate bleeding or spotting from the rectum following treatment. Some patients experience fever, stomach problems such as diarrhea or constipation, and infection after treatment.

 

*It is important for you to know that you may not experience immediate improvement after your first treatment with Solesta, and the full effects of Solesta may not be apparent until 3 to 6 months after treatment.

Solesta is given by a medical doctor certified to perform the Solesta procedure. Most often it is given by a specialist such as a colon and rectal specialist, gastroenterologist, or urogynecologist. The Solesta procedure is covered by Medicare.

To find a specialist who can provide Solesta, click here.

 

TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT SOLESTA
Spend less time dealing with bowel control problems and more time enjoying life

Why it's important to bring up bowel control

Even if you've already discussed bowel control problems with your doctor, it's worth bringing up again. If it's a problem, it's a problem. Use the following guide to help you open up–or to revisit the subject.

Move ahead with more accident-free days

Hear from someone who has been treated with Solesta in
"Lisa's Journey."

Find a physician who specializes in Solesta

Indication for SOLESTA

SOLESTA® is indicated for the treatment of fecal incontinence in patients 18 years and older who have failed conservative therapy (eg. diet, fiber therapy, anti-motility medications).

Important Safety Information about SOLESTA

It is important for you to know that SOLESTA® (hyaluronic acid/dextranomer) does not work for everyone and you may not benefit from SOLESTA treatment. It is also important for you to know that you may not experience immediate improvement after your first treatment with SOLESTA and the full effects of SOLESTA may not be apparent until 3 to 6 months after treatment.

People who have an infection or who are currently experiencing bleeding in the rectum or anus should not receive SOLESTA. People who have problems in the rectum or anus, such as tumor, abnormal anatomy, large dilated blood vessels (hemorrhoids), or cracks in the tissue (anal fissures) should not receive SOLESTA. People who have active inflammation of their bowels (Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis) should not receive SOLESTA. People who have trouble fighting off infection (immunodeficiency disorder such as HIV/AIDS) or who take medication to suppress the immune system, such as those used in cancer or organ transplant patients, should not receive SOLESTA. If you already have a device or material placed in your rectum or anus, or if you have had radiation treatments in your pelvic area before, you should not receive SOLESTA.

The most common risks of treatment with SOLESTA in the clinical study were mild or moderate pain or discomfort in the rectum or anus, and minor to moderate bleeding or spotting from the rectum following treatment. Some patients experience fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, or constipation after treatment.

More serious risks including infection and inflammation of the tissues in the anus may occur but are not common.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For product information, adverse event reports, and product complaint reports, please contact:

Salix Product Information Call Center
Phone: 1-800-508-0024
Fax: 1-510-595-8183
Email: salix@medcomsol.com

Please see complete Prescribing Information for SOLESTA.

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